Insaaf ka mandir hai ye, by Sneh Dhingra

This song touches me to the core and gives goosebumps every time I listen to it. It is instrumental in terms of bringing to us a sentiment that elevates our life’s significance. The song permeates through the ears to the heart and I am sure, there will be agreement, that the soul within us senses and appreciates the valuable sentiments expressed all through the song.. a fervent hope that in the hands of the Lord lies all that we need to satisfy our life’s purpose.. fairness, strength, perseverance, equanimity with our surroundings.. even the bells that ring in the song.. to me.. solemnly bridge the gaps in our psyches..

This video is divided into 3 parts. There is no exchange of garlands but a very unusual exchange of a necklace(one needs to watch the scene, it has a very great significance in the story).

The song gives one of the biggest representation of a bhajan to conform to a difficult situation in life. All the players in this beautiful song are not of the Hindu faith, but have done superb justice to the sentiments – Shakeel, Naushad, Rafi, Dilip, Madhubala and Nimmi. Totally awesome!

Madhubala, Dilip and Nimmi in a classic triangle. Mehboob Khan was a lofty personality and produced some very thought-provoking movies with stories that fit completely with the need of the moment in society. Here, a fleeting moment of weakness for Dilip lands poor Nimmi in a turmoil. Dilip himself is in love with and engaged to an affluent Madhubala . Nimmi’s predicament, Dilip’s pangs of conscience and Madhubala’s understanding and sacrifice are neatly woven in this song.

Shakeel’s words are lofty, for they aim for the higher echelons of human sensitivity, spiritual leanings and pointers to correct behaviour and consequences. Naushad has used his musical needles to weave Shakeel’s poetry into a tapestry which will shine for time immemorial. It is not crime and punishment.. it is crime and penance. Back in those days, this was considered enough for atonement. Under current laws, there would be a nice lockup, but how would that help the poor, helpless maiden in distress.

Madhubala’s role in this film is a superb one, where she did not use her wealth to cover up a misdeed, the reparation of which led her to lead a life of regret, misery and heartache. And the look of perfect grace that is evident on her face in this song, in the last part, is so sublime, so elevating.

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Originally published on 11 August 2018 in a group under the theme “Songs other actors are singing with the lead actors in the frame”.

Sneh Dhingra (nee Khanna) was born in Delhi to an Army Officer father; consequently, she spent time in several cities, going to school at Patna, graduating in Physics major from Meerut, and also living in Delhi, Lucknow and Kanpur before migrating to Canada, where she has lived since 1975. She is currently based in Ottawa.

3 thoughts on “Insaaf ka mandir hai ye, by Sneh Dhingra

  1. This is absolutely brilliant Sneh, each line beautifully crafted, every thought superbly expressed…”even the bells that ring in the song, solemnly bridge the gaps in our psyches”… wow! And…”it is not crime and punishment, it is crime and penance”…well said.

    It was a pleasure to read your piece, more power to your pen dear lady! 😊👏🏻

  2. beautiful post Sneh, and so apt, “The song gives one of the biggest representation of a bhajan to conform to a difficult situation in life. All the players in this beautiful song are not of the Hindu faith, but have done superb justice to the sentiments – Shakeel, Naushad, Rafi, Dilip, Madhubala and Nimmi. Totally awesome!”

    I would add Mehboob Khan, the filmmaker…it has to be his large canvass which included this idea. Remarkable. But the song kills…the advice about sin and God’s justice….

    1. Thank you tons, Manek. You are so right about Mehboob Khan. Such immersion into the Hindu faith is spectacular from all these artists.

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